You would think that sophisticated search engine algorithms would be able to differentiate between similar URLs like

http://www.example.com/page/

and http://www.example.com/page

and http://www.example.com/page/index.htm.”

You’d be wrong. That example is taken from Google’s Duplicate Content advice, and it would be good to refresh your memory about the subject before starting in on a content audit. The short page is packed with useful advice from the people who know what they will be using to rank your site. What’s not to like about that?

The Problem Is The Perception

Google understands that duplicate content has to exist — one example would be the same content on a page and in a “printer-friendly” version on another page. Instead of blocking crawler access to duplicate content and making it look like you are hiding something spammy, mark those pages as duplicates.

You can do this with the rel="canonical" link element, 301 redirects, or the URL parameter tool. Before you start, look over Google’s advice and decide what is the best option for your site. Then be consistent in applying your duplicate content solution. The goal is to make sure that the search engines (all of them) perceive your content accurately so your site can be presented fairly in the results of a search.

The New Year Is Natural For Evaluating Your Business

You should audit the content on your site regularly, right? It’s part of the maintenance that keeps a business running smoothly, catching potential problems and ensuring optimal operations. I think a well-maintained site helps the user perceive your content accurately so that your business is presented fairly when they visit you online.